Reluctant Medium Virtual “Treasure Hunt” Tour Week One

St. Francis CathedralCopyright G G Collins

St. Francis Cathedral
Copyright G G Collins

Today we begin our Reluctant Medium “treasure hunt” tour. The clues will remain safely tucked into the eBook, but we’ll visit the places where Rachel Blackstone found the clues. And you’ll have a chance to practice your psychic skills at the end.

Rachel is our Reluctant Medium. Her first career is as a journalist and now she seems to have a part-time job as a medium, much to her disdain. We pick up where Rachel found the first verse of clues to find her brother.

It seemed a normal day, even though Rachel had already been visited by the evil spirit. She ran into the Santa Fe New Mexican, the city’s daily paper, to drop off her story sources for review. Before Rachel could leave the newspaper office, the receptionist stopped her, giving her an envelope with the first clue to where her brother was.

The New Mexican’s office is found on Marcy Street near the downtown Santa Fe library in an unremarkable building. However, in its 158-year history it has occupied several locations including in the Plaza and on Palace Avenue.

Let’s walk a block and make a left onto Palace Avenue. The Palace Avenue site was later inhabited by the Manhattan Project during top-secret development of the atomic bomb in Los Alamos during WWII. Mail came to a P.O. Box rather than to the covert headquarters. It’s now the home of The Rainbow Man, since 1945, where the shopper can buy jewelry, folk art, masks and pottery. I dare you not to buy anything.

Another clue was waiting for her at the Cathedral Basilica of St. Francis Assisi

or commonly known as the St. Francis Cathedral. The cathedral dominates the downtown Plaza area. It’s one of the first stops made by visitors to the City Different. It’s on Cathedral Place, within our sight as we stand on the sidewalk under the portal (porch). Cross the street. Okay, everyone run up the steps!

The cathedral was built around an adobe chapel. When the new structure was

Interior of St. Francis Cathedral
Copyright G G Collins

complete, the small church, called La Parroquia, was dismantled and torn out except for a small chapel now on the north side of the church. The Archbishop Jean Baptiste Lamy (you’ll hear the Lamy name everywhere) had the cathedral built, not in the adobe style, but in Romanesque Revival. The yellow limestone was quarried near the current town of Lamy (told you, it’s everywhere). A statue of Lamy keeps vigil in front of the church.

The lovely rose window over the entrance was imported from France. Sadly, due to a lack of funds, the towers were not finished. The church was designed with two 160-foot steeples. But when construction stopped, it left one tower a single row of bricks shorter than the other, making one wonder if the money ran out abruptly. Can’t you just visualize (of course we can, we’re mediums, albeit reluctant) someone blowing a whistle, the bricklayers throwing down their trowels and climbing down?

Candles at St Francis Cathedral, Santa Fe, NMCopyright G G Collins

Candles at St Francis Cathedral, Santa Fe, NM
Copyright G G Collins

The interior of the cathedral contains elegant Corinthian columns and round arches. It is a humbling structure and quite spiritual to sit in. Take a few minutes to look upon the grandeur that is the St. Francis Cathedral. The Baptismal font was added about a decade ago and is made of Brazilian granite.

Candles are available just inside the church. You may light one for a loved one before we go. 

For more information on the St. Francis Cathedral, check out:  http://www.cbsfa.org/home0.aspx

— G G Collins

Copyscape Do Not Copy

 

 

Here’s your chance to try out your psychic skills—or Google skills?

There are many ghost stories in Santa Fe. A few blocks from the St. Francis Cathedral, along the Santa Fe River, is a story that endures. I’m told there are more than 40 variations on this ghastly tale and it is a favorite throughout the southwest.

Many years ago, the poor would park their wagons along the Santa Fe River (more of a trickle most of the time). According to the story, a woman from one of those wagons met and fell in love with a Conquistador. After having two children with him, she found he had been unfaithful (isn’t that just always the way?). In her sorrow, she took her children, and drowned them in the river. There are two versions of the ending: either she rejoiced that they were gone, then fell and suffered a fatal injury, or she hung herself in regret.

There are reports from people walking in the river park that they heard a woman calling for her babies, but saw no one. She has been seen at the nearby PERA Building. Workers have reported she is a dark shape and messes with the lights in the building. This ghost is known as the Weeping Woman.

Using your psychic abilities, the name of the Weeping Woman was:

(a)    La Plazuela

(b)    La Llorona

(c)    Las Golondrinas

For the answer, check back next Sunday. And, we’ll travel to another stop on Rachel’s journey to save her brother.

Hasta luego.

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About G G Collins

Writer of Paranormal Mystery Series, Soft-Boiled Mystery Series, Teen & Young Adult Fiction. Reporter. Blogger.

Posted on June 30, 2012, in Treasure Hunt in Santa Fe, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. Nearest translation I could come up with: ‘Major source of inspiration, the meeting between the foreign and the city comes in the arts, the mode of diversity, both thematically and formally.’

    Thanks for stopping by. I’m assuming you’re French-Canadian. I speak only a small amount of French so I hope my translation is close. It’s a beautiful language. I’ve had wonderful visits to Canada. Lovely welcoming people.

    Like

  2. Source majeure d’inspiration, la rencontre entre l’étranger et la cité se décline, dans le domaine artistique, sur le mode de la diversité, à la fois thématique et formelle.

    Like

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